GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS (1992)

Review by Derrick Carter

Running Time: 1 hour 40 minutes

MPAA Rating: R for Language

Directed by: James Foley

Written by: David Mamet

(based on the play GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS by David Mamet)

Starring: Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon, Alec Baldwin, Alan Arkin, Ed Harris, Kevin Spacey, Jonathan Pryce & Bruce Altman

GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS is quite interesting for a lot of reasons. In 1984, playwright David Mamet penned the play that this film was based upon and that play went on to receive the Pulitzer Prize and a Tony. In 1992, Mamet adapted his own play for the big screen and whoever cast this film did one hell of a job in filling the roles. Pacino, Lemmon, Baldwin, Arkin, Harris, Spacey, and Pryce have all put in acclaimed performances throughout their success-filled careers. However, to see them all in one place is stunning. Even though this film bombed at the box office, it wound up being nominated for an Academy Award and a Golden Globe. If you like dialogue-driven narratives and amazing acting, then you’ll likely find something to love in GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS.

At a small real estate firm, four salesmen are competing in a high-stakes competition that will result in the winner getting a bonus and a brand new car. This competition just got more important as the company higher-ups have sent in a trainer (Alec Baldwin) to reveal that the top two salesmen will be keeping their jobs and the rest will be fired. This dire discovery puts the employees in a desperate spot. Dave Moss (Ed Harris) and George Aaronow (Alan Arkin) talk about possibly getting revenge on the company. Washed-up, has-been Shelley “The Machine” Levene (Jack Lemmon) desperately tries to close his lousy leads. Meanwhile, office superstar Ricky Roma (Al Pacino) seems to be sky-high on his sales. However, things become drastically more complicated when a burglary occurs at the firm and its clear that one (or more) of the salesman might be responsible.

Though there are crime-mystery elements in its second half, GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS mainly functions as a downbeat drama and dark comedy about four salesmen desperately trying to prove their importance. As a result, this plot is purely forward by dialogue and conversations…which means the acting had better be really damn good or the viewer would be in for one long drag of a film. Thankfully, GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS’s strongest qualities are its powerhouse performances and the snappy dialogue.

The best performance easily comes from Jack Lemmon as “The Machine” Levene. This character seems like a sad shell of the person he used to be. Lemmon won a Best Actor award at the Venice Film Festival for his more than believable portrayal of the live-action equivalent of Gil from THE SIMPSONS. Honestly, Lemmon deserved this film’s nomination for the Academy Award and Golden Globe as well. You legitimately feel sorry for his character and you can visibly see the desperation on his face throughout damn near the entire film. You also see how cocky he gets upon potential newfound success as well. Lemmon’s Levene steals the show!

Though he’s only regulated to a single scene, Alec Baldwin dominates his sole moment as the foul-mouthed company “motivator.” Baldwin’s character’s motivational methods mainly consist of verbally demolishing everybody around him and laying on deep psychological abuse as he seems to almost revel in the fact that half of the firm will be out of jobs by the end of the so-called “competition.” Meanwhile, Ed Harris and Alan Arkin play off each other as two men who are so desperate for cash that they might put their entire futures at risk with thoughts of a bone-headed decision.

Al Pacino plays Ricky Roma, the only “good” salesman of the bunch. Roma’s devilishly slimy tactic is building trust/friendship and then unexpectedly springing his sale pitch on his newfound “friends.” Pacino’s Roma is about as scummy as a salesperson can be and there doesn’t seem to be a genuine bone in his body, unless he’s talking about screwing someone out of their hard-earned cash or ultimately benefiting himself. Jonathan Pryce pops in for a couple of scenes as one of Pacino’s insecure customers/”friends.” Also, Kevin Spacey stars as the stuck-up office drone, who coldly pisses off every single salesman at one point or another.

If nothing else, GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS will make you paranoid about ever talking to a salesperson again. The dialogue is loaded with more profanity than your average Quentin Tarantino movie, but flows along in a naturalistic and witty manner. The film’s constant conversations might bore some viewers who cannot stand the idea of watching salespeople talk, fight, argue, and accuse each other for just under two solid hours. However, GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS is an example of how great acting and smart dialogue can carry a film all by themselves. It’s not for everybody, but GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS should satisfy cinephiles who want to dig on an amazing cast of actors delivering fantastic performances.

Grade: B+

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