THE BOSS BABY (2017)

Review by Derrick Carter

Running Time: 1 hour 37 minutes

MPAA Rating: PG for some mild Rude Humor

Directed by: Tom McGrath

Written by: Michael McCullers

(based on the picture book THE BOSS BABY by Marla Frazee)

Voices of: Alec Baldwin, Miles Bakshi, Tobey Maguire, Steve Buscemi, Jimmy Kimmel, Lisa Kudrow & Conrad Vernon

To be completely honest, I had hopes for THE BOSS BABY. The trailers made this film look like a silly family friendly comedy, some of the jokes made me laugh, and the animation looked visually pleasing. DreamWorks Animation also has a pretty good track record, slight hiccups aside (cough, HOME, cough, SHREK THE THIRD). So I rented THE BOSS BABY with a pep in my step and hoped for the best. 97 minutes later, I’m baffled as to what the director, writer, cast, crew, and producers were even attempting to do with this movie. Despite having a couple of positive qualities, THE BOSS BABY is a mind-boggling combination of bad ideas and uneven storytelling.

Based on the picture book of the same name, THE BOSS BABY follows young Tim Templeton (Miles Bakshi) who’s content with being an only child and receiving all the love from his parents (Jimmy Kimmel, Lisa Kudrow). Tim finds his normal life shattered when his parents arrive with new baby brother Theodore (Alec Baldwin). This suit-wearing infant (who’s constantly carrying a briefcase) isn’t like other babies though, because he’s actually been sent from Baby Corp to stop the rival company Puppy Co. from stealing love away from babies worldwide. Things get more complicated when Tim realizes his new brother’s identity and the two work together to stop evil CEO Francis E. Francis (Steve Buscemi) from killing off new babies forever.

From the plot description, you may be thinking to yourself, “Man, THE BOSS BABY sounds really stupid and weird.” Well, you haven’t heard the last of this movie’s strangeness. In a creative decision that seems clever at first and then becomes confusing, THE BOSS BABY has imagination sequences in which Tim shows off his crazy thoughts and pretends to be on adventures. A smarter movie might have framed the entire “infant secret agent versus adorable puppies” storyline as a product of Tim’s overactive imagination. BOSS BABY’s visual style makes it clear that the imagination sequences have nothing to do with the super-smart infant with a business mindset.

This movie might make sense if the viewer were high whilst watching it (not that I’m advocating that…unless it’s legal where you live). In BABY’s own mismatched logic, the storyline doesn’t make a lick of sense. Of course, this piece of family entertainment also tries to cap things off with a forced feel-good message about brotherly love and family in the final ten minutes. However, this only left me scratching my head and rolling my eyes. After all, how will THE BOSS BABY 2 (scheduled for 2021) ever happen if we’re to buy into the would-be emotional ending that this film tries to sell us?

As far as the voice cast goes, the two big stand-outs are Alec Baldwin as the titular boss baby and Steve Buscemi as the CEO antagonist. Baldwin’s constant mixing of baby language with adult business lingo supplies a few laughs. The film’s humor also has references to GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS and even THE MATRIX for older viewers to enjoy, but constantly goes to the well of toilet, drool, fart, and vomit jokes. Meanwhile, Buscemi’s baddie and his lumbering silent sidekick provide genuine laughs as over-the-top evil characters. I enjoyed watching their scenes and these moments are easily the best bits in the entire film. Every other character is bland and predictable, including main character Tim.

THE BOSS BABY seemingly doesn’t know what audience it’s aiming for and is constantly conflicted about its cinematic identity. There are fart jokes and colorful images to keep the kiddies occupied. However, the plot gets needlessly complex (with a never-explained mixture of imagination and “reality”) and a crazy conspiracy thriller aspect. A Tobey Maguire narrated epilogue attempts to sell this as an emotional tale, but that feels entirely unnecessary and unearned. At the end of the day, the animation is nice to look at and there are a handful of laughs to be had, but those are about the only positive things I can say for THE BOSS BABY. Again, I’m not advocating it (unless it’s legal where you live), but THE BOSS BABY is indeed a children’s film that might make more sense and be far more enjoyable if the viewer was high.

Grade: D+