STORKS (2016)

Review by Derrick Carter

Running Time: 1 hour 27 minutes

MPAA Rating: PG for mild Action and some Thematic Elements

storks-poster

Directed by: Nicholas Stoller & Doug Sweetland

Written by: Nicholas Stoller

Voices of: Andy Samberg, Katie Crown, Kelsey Grammer, Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele, Anton Starkman, Jennifer Aniston, Ty Burrell, Stephen Kramer Glickman & Danny Trejo

In the world of theatrical animation, it seems that certain companies hold significant sway on the moviegoing public. These include: Disney, Pixar, DreamWorks, Sony Animation and (to an extent) Blue Sky.  One studio that’s had many underperformers in the past, but seems to be rising in recent popularity is Warner Bros. Animation. Released in a gap between two different LEGO movies, STORKS wasn’t a giant box office hit with audiences or critics. However, this is a fun comedy with vibrant animation, tons of solid jokes, and a heartwarming message.

STORKS, from left: Tulip (voice: Katie Crown), Junior (voice: Andy Samberg), 2016. © Warner Bros./

Storks have delivered babies for centuries, but that service is a relic of the past. Today, storks deliver packages for online retailer Corner Store. When ambitious stork Junior (Andy Samberg) is offered a high-profile promotion from his intimidating boss Hunter (Kelsey Grammer), he soon discovers that the position comes with strings attached. Junior is ordered to fire 18-year-old orphan Tulip (Katie Crown), a former baby that got lost in the company’s system. Unable to go through with her termination, Junior reassigns Tulip to the abandoned mailroom…just as lonely 10-year-old Nate (Anton Starkman) puts in an order form for a sibling. Mismatched pair Junior and Tulip are soon thrust into a hazardous adventure to deliver the newborn baby…while evil Hunter and his pigeon lackey (Stephen Kramer Glickman) are hot on their trail.

STORKS, Pigeon Toady (voice: Stephen Kramer Glickman), 2016. © Warner Bros.

STORKS has colorful animation and wears its heart on its sleeve. It’s clear that lots of love and effort went into making this film, even though it follows a familiar formula and has its share of clichés. The animation style reminded me of CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS and MEGAMIND, meaning that it was pretty darn great to look at. There are plenty of jokes sprinkled throughout that adults will catch and lots of kid-friendly humor that viewers of all ages will enjoy. The film’s biggest highlight for me was Pigeon Toady, a brown-nosing runt of a baddie that has a Donald Trump hairdo. One conversation with Pigeon and Junior in an elevator had me cracking up, especially with a final so-stupid-it’s-hilarious punchline.

STORKS, from left: Beta Wolf (voice: Jordan Peele), Alpha Wolf (voice: Keegan-Michael Key), 2016. ©

Much of STORKS works because the wacky sense of humor makes up for any ill will that one could have towards this film’s problems. The characters are running from place to place and coming across various obstacles as they try to deliver a baby to her family, kind of like ICE AGE with a stuck-up bird and a red-headed inventor. The plot is familiar, but many of the jokes significantly raise this story’s entertainment value. Other stand-out moments include: a quiet fight (because the baby is sleeping) against a group of penguins, and frequent encounters with a pack of shape-shifting wolves. These scenes may be childish, but that doesn’t make them any less funny.

STORKS, center: Hunter (voice: Kelsey Grammer), 2016. © Warner Bros.

As far as the voice cast goes, STORKS includes a few notable names. The Lonely Island’s Andy Samberg voices Junior, a character who seems overly familiar and still has a good enough emotional arc. Katie Crown (who is mostly an unknown) is great as Orphan Tulip, gaining laughs purely from her line delivery in certain scenes. Kelsey Grammer is well-cast as the intimidating big bad boss. Meanwhile, Ty Burrell and Jennifer Aniston play the parents of little Nate. Key and Peele are also hilarious as the aforementioned wolves.

STORKS, from left: Henry Gardner (voice: Ty Burrell), Nate Gardner (voice: Anton Starkman), Sarah

Besides utilizing a familiar formula, STORKS encounters a couple of other problems that hold it back from being great. Nate’s subplot of wanting a sibling and his workaholic parents bonding with him both feel slightly out-of-place in this wacky adventure. This brings me to another problem with STORKS: the pacing. This movie rushes past the viewer in under 90 minutes. Sometimes, that can be great for an animated feature that doesn’t wish to overstay its welcome. However, STORKS plows through important plot points before they’ve even had time to develop. This is especially true of a would-be emotional moment that doesn’t leave much of an impact because it’s resolved less than five minutes later.

STORKS, from left: Junior (voice: Andy Samberg), the baby, and Tulip (voice: Katie Crown), 2016. ©

Even with its flaws, I had a blast watching STORKS. The humor really elevated this film in my eyes. You could predict where the plot was going from the get-go and the film’s pacing compromises a few moments that should have been lingered on, but the humor is plentiful and the animation is pleasing to look at. This may not reinvent the wheel of animated family comedies and might not be up to the levels of many popular CGI family-comedies from other big studios, but STORKS is highly entertaining. If you’re in the mood to laugh or need to pick a quick flick to stick in front of your kids, STORKS should fit both of those needs just fine.

Grade: B

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