THE NIGHT MANAGER (2016)

Review by Derrick Carter

Running Time: 6 hours 1 minute

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Starring: Tom Hiddleston, Hugh Laurie, Olivia Colman, Tom Hollander, Elizabeth Debicki, Alistair Petrie, Natasha Little, Douglas Hodge, David Harewood & Tobias Menzies

John Le Carre is known for writing realistic, down-to-earth versions of 007 material. As opposed to explosions and gun fights, you’re more likely to watch people have intense conversations, sneak around, and occasionally murder in a Le Carre adaptation. This British author has found unexpected modern resurgence with the critically acclaimed TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, brilliantly executed A MOST WANTED MAN, and upcoming OUR KIND OF TRAITOR. One of Le Carre’s novels has recently taken a turn to the smaller screen with BBC’s THE NIGHT MANAGER. If you’re into Le Carre’s espionage stories and talky thrillers, you’ll likely enjoy this miniseries. If you’re not into either of those things, this six-hour slow burn might bore you.

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Jonathan Pine (Tom Hiddleston) is a former British soldier turned hotel manager. After one particularly stressful night, Pine finds himself in possession of sensitive documents that detail illegal arms dealings. With evidence of enough illegal weaponry to start a war and a desire to stop these international criminals, Pine finds himself recruited by bureaucratic Angela Burr (Olivia Colman). Pine’s top-secret mission is to change his identity, infiltrate a group of arms dealers, and expose them for everything they’re worth. This assignment puts Pine headlong into the path of “worst man in the world” Richard Roper (Hugh Laurie), Roper’s attractive girlfriend Jed (Elizabeth Debicki), and his loyal assistant Corkoran (Tom Hollander). A game of cat-and-mouse ensues as Pine attempts to gather evidence, expose secrets, and maintain his cover.

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A film adaptation of THE NIGHT MANAGER has tentatively been in production for two decades, with one version featuring a far younger Hugh Laurie in the role of Pine. Various writers and directors came to the conclusion that there was simply too much material to squeeze into a single film, which made a miniseries format much more alluring. I personally think that this novel could have been tidily compacted into one tense three-hour movie, but this longer small-screen NIGHT MANAGER is allowed much more time to develop its characters within its six episodes. This extra time also allows for subplots to receive more attention that might have otherwise been excised entirely in a big screen version.

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NIGHT MANAGER’s episodes frequently cut between Pine and Roper’s cat-and-mouse game and much quieter scenes of Angela Burr’s struggles to keep the operation afloat, in spite of corrupt higher-ups in Roper’s pocket. Herein comes a pacing struggle, because Burr’s storyline only starts getting interesting during the final two episodes. Nearly everything in the latter storyline feels slightly like filler and noticeably detracts a bit from the far more intense (and interesting) battle of wills/wits between Hiddleston’s Pine and Laurie’s Roper. This may have been the way that John le Carre’s novel played out, but what is written on the page doesn’t always translate well to the screen. That might be the case here.

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Uneven pacing aside, THE NIGHT MANAGER is compelling if only to watch Tom Hiddleston play a character unlike any he’s ever touched before and to see Hugh Laurie portray a truly despicable villain. Hiddleston’s Jonathan Pine may seem like a stereotypical English gentlemen, but an inner darkness begins to reveal itself as the episodes go on. One shouldn’t mistake Pine’s politeness for weakness, because this man is a well-dressed 007 type that isn’t above committing violent acts in the name of revenge and the greater good. A cunning oppositional force comes in Laurie’s Richard Roper. Roper is a believable villain in that he rarely gets his hands dirty, but is more than willing to pay other “lower” people to do that for him. Roper is an intelligent businessman who happens to be in the business of death and destruction, which makes him extremely dangerous. The calm way in which Laurie’s baddie dolls out threats makes him even more intimidating, because we know that he absolutely means and will commit to every word he says.

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Elizabeth Debicki is convincing as Roper’s naïve wife and unconvincing as a forced love interest for Pine. Their romantic affair feels like an afterthought, when it should have been treated as a major plot development. If less time had been spent on the U.K. political subplot, then that might have been an option. As much as I’m ragging on her far less interesting and filler-filled storyline, Olivia Colman is serviceable enough as Agent Burr (Pine’s boss). The real scene-stealer of the supporting cast comes in Tom Hollander as Corkoran (a.k.a. Corky). Corky is such a wicked scumbag and doesn’t bother to hide it. His confrontations with Hiddleston are among the best moments in the entire miniseries. He’s a perfect sidekick to Hugh Laurie’s already diabolical antagonist.

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NIGHT MANAGER’s production values are stellar across the board. From theme credits that intersperse weapons alongside wine glasses and chandeliers to the eloquently expensive look of every frame, it’s clear that there was a big budget behind this miniseries. The story spans across many countries, allowing for glamorous shots and detailed locations. NIGHT MANAGER isn’t all glam and glitz though, because the series is remarkably tense, even in moments that don’t particularly seem exciting. I didn’t realize how wrapped up I was in this story until we are given a suspenseful sequence in which Pine is faced with a matter of seconds to grab some key info…or be caught by Roper and his dangerous friends.

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THE NIGHT MANAGER is a realistic James Bond story, complete with style, suspense, and a cat-stroking villain to boot (minus the cat). Hiddleston and Laurie’s tense battle of wits/wills makes this miniseries worth watching, even if Olivia Colman and her generic U.K. subplot feel like they belong in a different series altogether. Hollander’s Corky also sticks out as one of the miniseries greatest highlights. THE NIGHT MANAGER will likely satisfy viewers who can find a tense conversation to be equally as thrilling as an explosive shootout.

Grade: B+

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